• Thursday, Aug 06, 2020
  • Last Update : 01:05 pm

Scientists find hope toward increasing human lifespan

  • Published at 04:16 pm July 12th, 2020
Drosophila Melanogaster
Drosophila Melanogaster - A fruit fly in orange on leaf in green nature Bigstock

John Tower, professor of biological sciences, and his team found that the drug mifepristone extends the lives of female flies that have mated

Scientists of University of Southern California and Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences said they may have found the beginnings of a path toward increasing human lifespan.

Journal of Gerontology: Biological Sciences published the research on Friday that shows the drug mifepristone can extend the lives of two very different species used in laboratory studies, suggesting the findings may apply to other species, including human beings, reports news-medical.net.

Fruit fly Drosophila findings

John Tower, professor of biological sciences, and his team found that the drug mifepristone extends the lives of female flies that have mated.

The researchers went through one of the most common laboratory models used in genetic research- the fruit fly Drosophila.

Mifepristone, also known as RU-486, is used by clinicians to end early pregnancies as well as to treat cancer and Cushing disease.

During mating, female fruit flies receive a molecule called sex peptide from the male.

Previous research has shown that sex peptide causes inflammation and reduces the health and lifespan of female flies.

Tower and his team, including Senior Research Associate Gary Landis, lead researcher on the study, found that feeding mifepristone to the fruit flies that have mated blocks the effects of sex peptide, reducing inflammation and keeping the female flies healthier, leading to longer lifespans than their counterparts who did not receive the drug.

The drug's effects in Drosophila appear similar to those seen in women who take it.

Juvenile hormone effects

Searching for a better understanding of how mifepristone works to increase lifespan, Tower and his team looked at the genes, molecules and metabolic processes that changed when flies consumed the drug.

The researchers found that a molecule called juvenile hormone plays a central role.

Juvenile hormone regulates the development of fruit flies throughout their life, from egg to larvae to adult.

Sex peptide appears to escalate the effects of juvenile hormone, shifting the mated flies' metabolism from healthier processes to metabolic pathways that require more energy to maintain.

 Further, the metabolic shift promotes harmful inflammation, and it appears to make the flies more sensitive to toxic molecules produced by bacteria in their microbiome and Mifepristone changes all of that.

When the mated flies ate the drug, their metabolism stuck with the healthier pathways, and they lived longer than their mated sisters who did not get mifepristone.

Notably, these metabolic pathways are conserved in humans, and are associated with health and longevity, said Tower.

New hope for human beings!  

Tower and collaborators Chia-An Yen, who obtained her PhD last spring from USC Dornsife College, and Sean Curran, associate professor of gerontology and biological sciences at USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology and USC Dornsife College, also gave mifepristone to another common laboratory model, a small roundworm called C elegans.

The scientists found the drug had the same life-extending effect on the mated worm.

Drosophila fruit flies and C. elegans worms sit on relatively distant branches of the evolutionary tree, Tower believes the similar results in such different species suggest other organisms, including humans, might see comparable benefits to lifespan.

Tower said that "In terms of evolution, Drosophila and C. elegans are equally as distant from each other as either one is distant from humans."

He also said that the fact that mifepristone can increase lifespan in both species suggests the mechanism is important to many species.

Tower emphasized that a clearer understanding of the intricacies of mifepristone's actions is needed before drawing any firm conclusions.

"Our data show that in Drosophila, mifepristone either directly or indirectly counteracts juvenile hormone signalling, but the exact target of mifepristone remains elusive."

Revealing that target may give scientists critical insight needed to extend lifespan in people.

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