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World powers, Iran clinch 'historic' nuclear deal

  • Published at 02:54 am November 24th, 2013

Iran agreed to curb its nuclear programme in exchange for sanctions relief in a breakthrough deal with world powers reached Sunday after a decade of failed diplomacy and rising tensions.

US President Barack Obama said the preliminary accord clinched in marathon Geneva talks was “an important first step” towards easing fears once and for all that Tehran will get the bomb.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, whose elections in June raised big hopes for a thaw with the West, said on Twitter that the breakthrough was made possible by the “Iranian people's vote for moderation” and that it would “open new horizons.”

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's office however immediately called the agreement struck in Geneva a “bad deal,” saying it still left the Islamic republic with the capacity to make a nuclear weapon.

“Today, the United States together with our close allies and partners took an important first step toward a comprehensive solution that addresses our concerns with the Islamic Republic of Iran's nuclear programme,” Obama said at the White House.

“While today's announcement is just a first step, it achieves a great deal.

“For the first time in nearly a decade, we have halted the progress of the Iranian nuclear programme, and key parts of the programme will be rolled back.”

The Arms Control Association called the deal an “historic breakthrough” in the decade-old impasse a “net plus for nuclear nonproliferation and international security.”

Under the deal between Iran and the five permanent members of the UN Security Council plus Germany announced at 3:00am Geneva time (0200 GMT), Tehran will limit uranium enrichment – the area that raises most suspicions over Iran's alleged nuclear weapons drive – to low levels.

It will neutralise its entire stockpile of uranium enriched to medium 20-percent purities – close to weapons-grade – within six months, US Secretary of State John Kerry said in Geneva where he and other foreign ministers helped nail down the deal.

Iran will also not add to its stockpile of low-enriched uranium, nor install more centrifuges or commission the Arak reactor. UN atomic inspectors will also have additional, “unprecedented” access, Kerry said.

In exchange the deal will afford the Islamic republic some $7bn in sanctions relief and the powers promised to impose no new embargo measures for six months if it sticks by the accord.

This represents “limited, temporary, targeted, and reversible relief while maintaining the vast bulk of our sanctions, including the oil, finance, and banking sanctions architecture,” the White House said.

During this six-month period, Iran and the US, China, Russia, France, Britain and Germany will negotiate a “comprehensive solution ... to give the international community confidence that Iran's nuclear activities will be exclusively peaceful.”