• Thursday, Aug 06, 2020
  • Last Update : 01:05 pm

Starc: Saliva ban may make cricket boring

  • Published at 08:10 pm May 26th, 2020
Mitchell Starc
Australia's Mitchell Starc in action at ICC Cricket World Cup - Australia v West Indies - Trent Bridge, Nottingham, Britain on June 6, 2019 Reuters

ICC is set to implement the ban in June after receiving medical advice that spit poses a COVID-19 transmission risk

Australian paceman Mitchell Starc warned Tuesday that cricket risks becoming "pretty boring" if ball-tampering rules are not relaxed in response to a coronavirus-linked ban on using saliva to shine the ball.

The International Cricket Council (ICC) is set to implement the ban in June after receiving medical advice that spit poses a COVID-19 transmission risk.

Bowlers traditionally get the ball to move in the air, deceiving the batsman, by shining one side using sweat or saliva.

Starc said swinging the ball in such a manner was a crucial part of the contest between bowler and batsman.

"We don't want to lose that or make it less even, so there needs to be something in place to keep that ball swinging," he told reporters in an online press conference.


"Otherwise people aren't going to be watching it and kids aren't going to want to be bowlers.

"In Australia in the last couple of years we've had some pretty flat wickets, and if that ball's going straight it's a pretty boring contest."

Anil Kumble, chairman of the ICC cricket committee, said this week that the saliva ban was only intended to be a temporary measure during the coronavirus crisis.

The former Indian Test spinner suggested cricket regulators did not want to open the door to using foreign substances to alter the condition of the ball.

Starc said he understood such reluctance, given the clear rules that exist against ball tampering.

But he said if bowlers were disadvantaged by a saliva ban, they should be given more leeway elsewhere.


The 30-year-old said ground staff could be ordered not to produce batsman-friendly flat wickets, or ball-tampering rules could be changed allowing a substance such as wax could be applied to the ball.

"It's an unusual time for the world and if they're going to remove saliva shining for a portion of time they need to think of something else for that portion of time as well," he said.

"(Either) with the wickets not being as flat or at least considering this shining wax."

Australian cricket ball manufacturer Kookaburra is developing a wax applicator that allows players to shine the ball without using saliva.


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