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Samaraweera: As top-order batsman, 50 isn't enough

  • Published at 12:21 am March 17th, 2017
Samaraweera: As top-order batsman, 50 isn't enough
Samaraweera said he is running out of ideas to deal with it after day two of the second and final Test against Sri Lanka at P Sara Oval in Colombo on Thursday. At one stage, Bangladesh were batting on 192 runs for the loss of two wickets with Imrul Kayes and Sabbir Rahman well set and batting well. However, from there, they lost three quick wickets to end the day on 214/5. “Honestly, I am out of ideas, the same thing happens every time. When we started to collapse, we can't control it. I think one rash shot making trouble for us. I can teach skill, but when you are batting in Test cricket you have to know what the opposition is doing, you have to have awareness. They played enough cricket and they have to understand the situation,” Samaraweera told the media in the post-day press conference. “I think you have to be intelligent in the middle. And we are lucky we finished with five [down], I thought [we will] finish with six. Hopefully, [Friday] is a new day. The first half an hour is crucial. Hopefully we can get close to Sri Lanka’s score. We have to start well again and we need one good partnership,” he said. Bangladesh crafted another good opening stand but were unable to capitalise on it as the top-order batsmen failed in their bid to convert 40s and 50s into big hundred. “If you are batting in the top five, you have to score hundreds. If you are happy with 50s, that is not enough. You can see in the last two Test matches – in Galle especially – after a first ball dismissal off a no-ball, unlucky for us, but what he (Kusal Mendis) did was he made a big 100, big 190 (194). Test cricket is all about scoring big runs, especially on a good pitch. It is still a good pitch, I think [Friday] is another good day for batting. Hopefully the next two, three guys can get close to the Sri Lanka score or we can get a 50-run lead,” said Samaraweera. “You can play natural game but you have to be aware of what the opposition is doing. That is Test cricket. What the opposition is doing, what is the field placement, what’s coming – that is the key. You can’t play every day like natural game. It is not like one-day cricket; in five-day cricket mentally you have to be strong,” he said. Regarding going up against the country of his birth, he added, “In the first few days I really felt it, because this is my first tour coaching against my country. After the series started, that feeling was broken bit by bit. I have lots of experience at these grounds – which is something you can’t buy. I have lots of great memories of the runs and hundreds I’ve scored here, and when I come to these grounds, I’m reminded of them again.”