• Monday, Dec 16, 2019
  • Last Update : 04:18 pm

Domingo not complaining about air pollution

  • Published at 08:22 pm November 1st, 2019
Vettori
Bangladesh coach Russell Domingo and spin bowling consultant Daniel Vettori wore breathing masks during training in New Delhi Friday AFP

The quality of air in the Indian capital has deteriorated so much that the city government has instructed schools to remain closed until Tuesday

A number of Bangladesh cricket players were forced to train in face masks at Feroz Shah Kotla Stadium in New Delhi Friday, but coach Russell Domingo has brushed off any health concerns from severe air pollution in the city. 

The quality of air in the Indian capital has deteriorated so much that the city government has instructed schools to remain closed until Tuesday.

Speaking to reporters ahead of Sunday's T20I versus India, the Bangladesh coach said they were only focused on giving a good showing and would not make an issue of the pollution situation.

"It’s not obviously perfect with the smog, but it's the same for both the teams," the South African told reporters.

"It's not perfect, it's not ideal, but it's nothing we're going to complain about and moan over. We just got to get on with it.

"For sure we have some scratchy eyes, maybe a little sore throats now and then, but it's been okay. Nobody is being sick or dying or anything like that."

This is not the first time that the air pollution in New Delhi has reared its head in cricket. 

During a Test match at Kotla in 2017, the smog caused Sri Lankan bowler Suranga Lakmal to vomit on the field, and questions were raised over whether matches should be scheduled in northern India during winter.

Referring to Bangladesh’s own struggles with air pollution, Domingo said the team were not taking any special measures of precautions.

"We know Sri Lanka struggled a bit last time. There's bit of pollution in Bangladesh as well. So it's not a massive shock to the system," Domingo said.

India's batting coach Vikram Rathour also dismissed any claims that the air pollution could be a factor.

"You're asking the wrong person I think," said the former player from Punjab.

"I've played all my life in north India. We're used to these conditions. We are not taking any special measure. The game has been scheduled and we're here to play."