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Roger Moore’s top 5 Bond films

  • Published at 11:08 pm May 24th, 2017
Roger Moore’s top 5 Bond films
As James Bond, Roger Moore seemed like more of a lover than a killer, and during his spell, 007 was always a gentleman. Though Sean Connery and George Lazenby had played 007 before Roger Moore on the big screen, but Moore was the first actor to deliberately shape Bond to his own strengths. Roger Moore, who passed away on Tuesday aged 89, portrayed the ultimate British secret agent in seven films in the 1970s and 80s, before handing the keys to the franchise to Timothy Dalton. 170523-roger-moore-james-bond-njs-933a_fffc1678866031c232985e1470d88447Live and Let Die, 1973 Moore made his début as Bond in this eighth flick of the franchise which is loosely adapted from Fleming’s second novel. The film follows Bond pursuing both a Harlem drug lord named Mr Big, and a Caribbean dictator named Kananga, only to find out they’re the same person. Live and Let Die came along at a time of instability for the franchise, with Moore becoming the third different actor to play Bond over the course of three movies. And by his endeavours, Moore brought some consistency back to the series. The Man with the Golden Gun, 1973 The title, notable for perhaps Moore’s most cruel and foul-tempered turn in the role, has a little bit of everything that’s great about Bond movies. It features a super weapon powered by the heat of the sun, a notorious super villain played by Christopher Lee, and a super-attractive Bond girl played by Britt Ekland. Moonraker, 1979 The film takes nothing from the Fleming novel and still manages to save the title. Moonraker plays as a largely straightforward and solid thriller. Moore went intergalactic as Bond teams with CIA agent played by Lois Chiles, after an American space shuttle is hijacked. And, no one looked as good in a spacesuit as Moore. The-Man-with-Golden-GunFor Your Eyes Only, 1981 Moore apparently wanted to exit the franchise after Moonraker, however in the end he came back to do For Your Eyes Only, which helped return the franchise to its roots. A harder-edged Bond with less gadgets, less slapstick and a plot of revenge, Cold War one-upmanship and shifting loyalties made the film quite thrilling and refreshing. Perhaps, Moore provides his best performance in the role. The Spy Who Loved Me, 1977 One of the best-loved 007 flicks of the franchise, The Spy Who Loved Me was the perfect balance of humour, thrills, gritty adventure and gadgets. For the first time, Moore found his sweet spot and appears at ease in the role, and getting to play off one of his best female leads, the smouldering Barbara Bach as a Russian agent. The film is like an exciting roller-coaster ride with stunning locations, including Egypt and Sardinia. Though it is not an adapatation of Fleming’s book, but the film is considered as the most iconic of Bond and Roger Moore as Bond.