• Tuesday, Sep 25, 2018
  • Last Update : 03:24 am

Mystery of the Great Pyramid of Giza solved

  • Published at 10:40 am September 26th, 2017
Mystery of the Great Pyramid of Giza solved
Archaeologists believe to have solved one of most puzzling question of history regarding to how the Great Pyramid of Giza was built in Egypt. New evidence reveals that the Egyptians transported 170,000 tonnes of limestone in boats to build the Great Pyramid at Giza, reports the Independent. According to the report, the new findings shed light on how King Khufu’s tomb, built over 4,000 years ago in about 2550 BC, was built. It has long been known that some rock had been extracted eight miles from Giza in a place called Tura, while granite was quarried from over 500 miles away. However, academics have differed in opinion regarding the way these materials were transported. A group of archaeologists working at the Giza pyramid complex have unearthed an ancient papyrus scroll which shows a boat and a network of waterways at the site of the pyramid. The scroll provided new evidence that points to how the oldest of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World was built. The new discoveries are being broadcast in a documentary called Egypt’s Great Pyramid: The New Evidence. Pierre Tale, who spent four years painstakingly deciphering the papyrus written by an overseer working on the pyramid’s construction, told Channel 4: “Since the very day of the discovery it was quite evident that we have the oldest papyrus ever found in the world.” The papyrus scroll is the only first-hand record of how the pyramid was built, and was written by an overseer named Merer. Archaeologists have found out that thousands of trained workers used boats to navigate canals dug along the River Nile for the purposes of transporting limestone. The finding suggests that the boats were held together by thick, twisted ropes, some of which have survived and were found in good condition. After collecting the materials, workers brought them to an inland port a few metres from the base of the pyramid. A total of some 2.3 million blocks of stone were shipped across the land over the course of two decades. American archaeologist Mark Lehner, who has over 30 years experience excavating in Egypt, said: “We’ve outlined the central canal basin, which we think was the primary delivery area to the foot of the Giza Plateau.”