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Divided we fall

  • Published at 10:57 pm August 29th, 2019
Chess

Are we turning into pawns for politicians?

The British decided to leave the Indian sub-continent in August 1947, ending the rule of the Raj. This resulted in two independent countries: India and Pakistan. The rulers indeed played shrewdly till the last moment of colonization, and left the native people divided.

Later on in 1971, Bangladesh got independence under the able leadership of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman from Pakistan after a nine-month-long war. Though we snatched away our freedom, being inspired in the spirit of unity and equality, it seems that even after 47 years of independence, we are again divided.

Well, there is no denying that we are now divided into many groups and the only point of contention to validate this division is our political ideology. The political leaders and parties of our country have instigated divisions among the masses. 

It is staggering to see that our teachers, journalists, lawyers, and even doctors have been divided. There is no harm in supporting a specific ideology, but it is also true that your ideology should not be the reason for someone else’s agony and hamper peaceful coexistence. 

For example, our DU teachers are split into two main groups: The Neel Dol consists of the pro-Awami League teachers, and Shada Dol comprises of teachers who are supporters of BNP. Despite the fact that both these groups have teachers of good calibre, they never work together for the betterment of the university and the students.

They always come up with divisive opinions, and the group supporting the ruling party enjoys different kinds of privileges and gets the upper-hand over other teachers. Under such circumstances, one may ask: If the teachers themselves are divided, how will they teach their students to be united and work together for the betterment of the country and its people?                  

Political parties have diverted the attention of the university students away from something creative to something comparatively destructive. Student politics has so far taken a heavy toll. 

Leaders have actually divided this larger concentration of students who have the ability and audacity to stand against any kind of injustice. As such, students who are fed by the political parties usually launch attacks on their fellows, and do not hesitate to injure them mercilessly. This is how political parties have very successfully turned the students against themselves, and exploited the energy of the students to their own selfish ends.   

Our political leaders are power-mongers, and they have segmented the citizens and the students along political lines so that no one can challenge their grip on power, even if the power is captured through illegitimate means. 

Machiavelli has clearly identified the application of such a strategy. Such a technique of divide and rule exhibits some basic characteristics. Firstly, political leaders will create or encourage division among the citizens to prevent alliances that may turn into a threat to their power in the long run, and will promote and aid those people who will cooperate with them and serve their vested interests. 

Well, we have lots of examples around us to justify these points.

To sum up, unless we realize their tricks and motives, we will never be able to excel in different fields as a nation. We must learn to coexist with differing opinions and ideologies. 

Our difference in ideologies should not overpower our conscience and initiate division among us. We should not forget that even Socrates and Plato had so many differences as far as their ideas and thoughts were concerned, nevertheless they never locked horns, spoke ill of one another in their absence, and inspired division in the society. Rather, they respected each other and created different paths for others to follow. 

We should learn to do so instead of turning ourselves into mere pawns of political leaders.

Md Morshedul Alam Mohabat is a journalist.