• Wednesday, Aug 21, 2019
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Compromised or complacent?

  • Published at 12:04 am April 24th, 2019
Sri Lanka Bombing
The situation is escalating REUTERS

What does the Sri Lanka bombing say about the state of security in the sub-continent?-1212,-658

Could the recent mass murder in Sri Lanka have been avoided?

In a small island nation like Sri Lanka, exactly why did it take ten whole days for the security threat to reach the attention of the highest seat of their government?

What was the excuse?

Why did the country’s security apparatus remain silent in the preceding ten days?

There are so many questions that need to be answered regarding the recent bombings in Sri Lanka.

Every nation, at least ones which can claim a stake to being developed to some degree, has a sizeable budget for the people’s safety and security. Despite that, how are such acts of violence and terror still going undetected by various governments all over the world? Attacks that clearly pose a danger to the lives of citizens.

To say that it is unacceptable is an underestimation of the gravity of the situation.

One must not forget that Bangladesh itself witnessed a similar incident on August 21, 2004 -- a grenade attack that claimed the lives of 25 political officers of the then opposition party, while a few hundred were injured, in a broad daylight.

It is clear by now that, by the way the suicide bombers and murderers operated, there is a pattern, and it is identical to past incidents around the world. Why is it always the men and women in charge of keeping us safe who are the last to know about such potential danger?

We have progressed so much as a nation, yet, whenever there is some sort of public congregation out on the streets, they are usually accompanied by stories of harassment or danger.

It is safe to say that the Sri Lankan government, in addition to ensuring safety and security of their own people, owes them an explanation as to how and why such a large-scale terror incident slipped by their radar.

People within the South Asian sub-continent are slowly losing faith in the security apparatus of their respective nations with each passing day. But what can we do? One cannot take the law in his/her own hands. It is high time for governments in this sub-continent to finally wake up and make advancements in counter-terrorism, ideally by taking a few lessons from more developed countries around the world.

When it comes to the issue of safety and security, no government can afford to compromise on any given measure -- given the current state of the world, where news of terror and industrial incidents run rampant, security should be the highest priority of any given government.

Regardless, the future looks bleak given the way mature democracies are behaving in both domestic and international affairs. 

Moazzem Hossain is a freelance contributor.