• Wednesday, Jun 19, 2019
  • Last Update : 02:18 am

Of moral misconducts and golden victories

  • Published at 08:02 am June 22nd, 2018
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This is Yemen REUTERS

What is the war a result of?

Yemen is of significant strategic interest as Yemen controls a narrow choke-point to the Red Sea and the Suez Canal through which 11% of the world’s petroleum passes each day. 

In addition, Yemen borders Saudi Arabia (to the north) and Oman (to the east) and has access to the Arabian Sea, through which another 20% of the world’s petroleum passes from the Strait of Hormuz (including the oil of Saudi Arabia and Iran). 

“Saudi Arabia seeks to control a port in Yemen to avoid the potential constriction of its oil shipments by Iran along the Strait of Hormuz or by countries which can control its other oil shipment path along the Red Sea,” said Julian Assange, in the Yemen Files, Wikileaks.

The UN Security Council rejected calls to end the Saudi-led assault in Hodeidah, Yemen (as the coalition has now taken over the city’s airport) because a number of the council’s members are a part of the Saudi-led coalition. For example, Kuwait could not agree to most of the agreement to halt the attack and wanted that the Houthis should withdraw from all seized territory. 

The only agreement the council was able to reach was that “only a negotiated political settlement can bring the war to an end.” Currently, the United Nations Security Council is made of China, France, Russian Federation, the United Kingdom, the United States, Bolivia, Côte d’Ivoire, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Netherlands, Peru, Poland, and Sweden. 

Without any serious opposition from the world, a port city of 600,000 (close to the size of San Franciso) has been ambushed, leading Saudi Arabia to claim a golden victory. The Saudi Arabia coalition is made up of the following entities (who provide variety of support systems from logistical to weapons sales): United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, Egypt, Jordan, Morocco, Senegal, Sudan, the US, US Navy, United States Army, United Kingdom, Australia, Turkey, Canada, South Korea, Malaysia, NATO, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Pakistan, Djibouti, Eritrea, Somalia, and France.

This particular war with Yemen sounds similar to Saudi Arabia’s alleged participation in the coalition that unravelled Libya and Syria, countries whose refugees are now stranded around the world, facing fates similar to that of Alan Kurdi. If so, what is the true blueprint of these conflicts? 

In respect to Yemen, is it that Yemeni ports need to be controlled by Saudi Arabia and its allies to guarantee preferential treatment? Is it that oil reserves in Saudia Arabia have another 90 years at best? Is it that Sunnis and Shias are still unable to sit down and negotiate? Is it that weapons manufacturers and financiers need conflict in order to drive sales?  

This war is perhaps a result of all of the above. Unfortunately, major news outlets are not investing enough in investigative journalism at a time when private or semi-private mercenary groups operate with billion-dollar budgets to enforce a specific world-order. 

With such a heavy and professional coalition armed against a country of 28 million, it was unprofessional of the UN Security Council to fail to come to an agreement. It is a moral misconduct when the Security Council allows the ambitions of its member countries to override conscientious action. 

When Karen Pierce, the UK ambassador to the UN, says: “We make our own decisions in the Security Council and we make them on the basis of the British national interest including wider issues of security. The most important aspect is to secure a political settlement: “We must note that the very mandate for creating the United Nations has failed.”

Shireen Pasha is a contributor.