• Friday, Feb 21, 2020
  • Last Update : 01:14 am

An unfortunate depletion

  • Published at 11:59 pm January 5th, 2020
WATER
PHOTO: MAHMUD HOSSAIN OPU

Open spaces and water-bodies are crucial for the environmental management which leads to the liveability of a city

It is extremely unfortunate that, in the span of just 20 years, our capital city has lost three-fourths of its water-bodies and more than two-thirds of its open spaces.

According to the study, conducted by Bangladesh Institute of Planners (BIP), the capital used to have 19.09 square-kilometres of water-bodies 20 years ago, but the amount has declined to 5.87 sq-km, while open spaces have reduced from 18.85 sq-km to 6.17 sq-km.

To that end, there is little doubt that this drastic reduction in both water-bodies and open space has been instrumental in Dhaka struggling today as far as being a liveable city for its citizens is concerned.

While there have been some efforts made to increase green spaces in recent times by planting more trees, this unfortunately has not been sufficient to make up for the losses experienced.

There is no doubt that Dhaka has been burdened by rampant industrialization, and while it isn’t easy to stop the rapid growth of a city such as the capital, it is the unplanned, unchecked nature of the construction that has resulted in Dhaka losing its water-bodies and open spaces.

Additionally, illegal grabbers, along with illegal business practices have only worsened an already precarious situation.

Suffice to say, this has become a trend, one that cannot be allowed to continue.

Open spaces and water-bodies are crucial for the environmental management which leads to the liveability of a city, and the lofty ambitions for Dhaka will mean nothing if the citizens do not have a liveable city to be in.

Candidates of the upcoming city corporation elections have already focused their attention on addressing Dhaka’s liveability, and we hope that they take into account the need for more open spaces while planning future infrastructural projects.