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Ensuring justice for all

  • Published at 12:04 am December 8th, 2019
Gavel, law
Photo: BIGSTOCK

Some hope can be seen in the proposed digitization of the judiciary, but we must tread with caution

Any nation, whether developed or on the road to becoming developed, must ensure, above all else, that its people, if wronged, are provided the justice they deserve.

Sadly, this has often not been the case in Bangladesh; too many people fail to receive any form of justice for crimes committed against them, and too many have to wait an agonizingly long time before their voices are even acknowledged, much less heard.

This must change.

On that note, it is extremely encouraging to see Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina herself speak of the need to deliver justice to the people of Bangladesh, and for our judiciary to do a better job of administering justice.

With a massive backlog of over 3 million pending cases in the lower courts alone, it is high time we addressed the sections of the judiciary that are largely to blame for the snail’s pace at which justice is served in the country.

What has been most frustrating is that it is often the law that is criticized, whereas in fact, it is the administering of those laws that remains wildly inconsistent.

To that end, some hope can be seen in the proposed digitization of the judiciary, but we must tread with caution -- going digital is not just a matter of pouring money into projects or purchasing equipment but rather, a change in mindset, where everyone understands the need to participate in a changed and upgraded system, while discarding the old, less efficient ways of doing things.

No doubt, fixing our judicial system will be anything but an easy task, but as our economy marches forward, it becomes more important than ever to ensure a stable, efficient justice system accessible to all.