• Wednesday, Dec 11, 2019
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There is no time to waste

  • Published at 12:05 am November 13th, 2019
Climate crisis change pollution
Photo: BIGTSOCK

The urgency of the situation cannot be overstated

Even after mountains of scientific evidence, there continue to be developed nations which still refuse to acknowledge the immediacy of the problem of climate change, while vulnerable countries such as Bangladesh have already begun to fight its initial effects.

Looking at a recent study by the World Economic Forum, it becomes clear that the situation appears to be far direr than was previously anticipated. 

The findings show that by 2100, nearly a fifth of the Bangladeshi population could be under high tide lines. If emissions continue to go unchecked, this could rise to a third of the population. Circumstances are so severe, in fact, that even immediate and deep emission cuts may not be able to prevent coastal lands from becoming uninhabitable by the end of the century, according to the report.

Although mitigation and adaptation are the most discussed solutions when it comes to climate change, perhaps it is time we focus more on a third: Compensation.

For countries such as Bangladesh -- which do not contribute to the global carbon footprint as much as many other industrialized countries, but have consistently been on lists of countries most vulnerable to climate change -- it is more than unfair to be left alone to bear the brunt of the consequences.

As such, it is high time for the global community to step forward and make sufficient reparations to nations like Bangladesh. 

However, even that is not enough. At this stage of the crisis, only a multi-faceted approach might be able to adequately combat it. Because different parts of the world are battling different stages of climate change, strategies utilizing mitigation, adaptation, and compensation to their fullest extents need to be employed.

There is next to no time at hand, and the urgency of the situation cannot be overstated.