• Friday, Dec 13, 2019
  • Last Update : 09:10 am

Putting a stop to unethical cow-fattening practices

  • Published at 12:00 am July 21st, 2019
Cattle
Photo: NASHIRUL ISLAM

The Animal Feed Act 2010 prohibits the use of antibiotics, growth hormones, harmful chemicals, and steroids

Eid-ul-Azha is on the horizon, so once again, we are seeing a spike in sale and the smuggling of illegal steroid tablets, and the rate of increase is nothing short of alarming.

These drugs are used to artificially fatten cows, and they not only make the beef dangerous for human consumption, but they also cause suffering to the sacrificial animal.

The practice of cow-fattening is, simply put, illegal, unethical, and against the spirit of Eid-ul-Azha.

Many traders will still claim that these contraband supplements are not harmful, but there is plenty of reason to believe that the chemicals being used may cause cancer, kidney disease, and infertility in women.

Causing unnecessary suffering to the animal also goes against the solemnity of the sacrifice.

To knowingly cause such damage to public health simply in order to drive up the profit margin is a crime, and must be dealt with by the authorities swiftly and sternly.

The Animal Feed Act 2010 prohibits the use of antibiotics, growth hormones, harmful chemicals, and steroids, with violators facing a year in jail, a fine, or both.

We give kudos to the law enforcement personnel who have already seized large amounts of contraband tablets, including the BGB team that recently seized a consignment of nearly 30,000 tablets in the Hili order area.

Eid-ul-Azha is one of the holiest festivals in our calendar, and it is of the greatest importance to ensure that the public are not swindled on this day, or any other day for that matter.