• Wednesday, Nov 20, 2019
  • Last Update : 07:59 pm

Nurturing young minds

  • Published at 12:01 am March 22nd, 2019
Photo: BIGSTOCK
Photo: BIGSTOCK

Research has consistently shown that traditional exams are not capable of measuring intelligence

It is no longer enough to recognize the importance of a primary education for all children in the country -- there needs to be a sustained focus towards improving the quality of schooling, so that these young minds are allowed to bloom in the best possible way.

In this respect, the government’s directive to not hold any examinations for students of Class I, II, and III is an initiative we can get behind. 

While exams are not altogether bad, it is also important to understand that exams, especially at such an early age, can impose unnecessary pressures on children’s curious minds, and do little to nurture their growth. 

Many countries throughout the world, such as Finland, Australia, and even India, have to a great extent understood the potential damage of exams at too young an age, and moved towards more effective methods of learning.

Research has consistently shown that traditional exams are not capable of measuring intelligence effectively, and it is encouraging to see the government recognize this.

Unfortunately, the problems with our education sector do not end there -- from the quality of teachers and textbooks to the corruption which plagues our educational institutions, there is no denying that the Education Ministry has its work cut out if it wants to bring true improvement.

There would be little point to merely removing exams if the education that children received was of an inferior quality to begin with.

But for now, removing exams from the early years of schooling is a laudable move, and certainly a step in the right direction.