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One man’s leftovers are another’s meal

  • Published at 05:17 pm May 9th, 2017
  • Last updated at 06:47 pm May 9th, 2017
One man’s leftovers are another’s meal

If we added up all the food that gets dumped every day, no one in this country would go hungry.

How many times have we thrown out perfectly good food after a sumptuous feast? How many times have we seen heaps of food go to waste at weddings in Dhaka?

And that appears to be the mission of Project Food Banking, an initiative by a youth-led volunteer group called Procheshta Foundation.

Launched in May 2016, the project works on a simple yet efficient model: Collect leftover food from different events in the city to feed underprivileged people.

Procheshta Foundation also has two schools that provide free education to over 200 students in Dhaka.

If we added up all the food that gets dumped every day, no one in this country would go hungry

The social consciousness of the founding members of the organisation is admirable, but the fact that they put their awareness into action and dedicated themselves to helping the less fortunate is nothing short of heroic. It reminds us that each and every one of us can make a difference.

Those who can afford frequent meals out do not usually bother to take to-go unfinished meals at the restaurant -- mostly because our culture does not encourage it.

In fact, it is almost looked down upon, because a lot of people in the upper echelons of society feel that it detracts from their image of opulence.

Perhaps the next time we go out to eat, we would do well to pack our leftover food and, on our way to the car, hand it over to the ubiquitous hungry person lingering about the sidewalk.

We cannot all set up large-scale free-food programs like the one by Amin Foundation which feeds up to 3,000 people every day, but we can certainly help out a few.

And that adds up.