• Monday, Nov 19, 2018
  • Last Update : 09:50 pm

When people simply disappear

  • Published at 06:08 pm August 30th, 2018
Editorial
Photo: BIGSTOCK

Oversight and investigations by an independent body may be required to root out criminal elements within our law enforcement agencie


According to legal rights advocacy group Ain O Salish Kendra, at least 310 people have gone missing in the last four years.

Out of this number, 44 were recovered as dead bodies, 33 have been returned alive, and 45 were later shown arrested, which leave us with the question: What happened to the rest?

It is a rollercoaster ride of hope and fear for the families of these disappeared individuals, who tend to get silence and a lack of cooperation from the authorities when they go asking questions.

When bodies are not found, little recourse is available to families when their loved ones disappear, as it is difficult to bring concrete cases against perpetrators.

Sometimes people languish in custody without any transparency about their situation, or due process being maintained.

Needless to say, this is an alarming trend, which the relevant authorities need to put a stop to immediately.

Law enforcement agencies are one of the fundamental pillars of a democratic society, and have a duty to be transparent in proving that they are accountable to citizens -- it does not bode well when serious allegations are made that law enforcement bodies have been responsible for forced disappearances.

We hope the inspector general of police takes action if law enforcement personnel are implicated in abductions or unexplained disappearances.

Furthermore, oversight and investigations by an independent body may be required to root out criminal elements within our law enforcement agencies, before the disturbingly high number of “missing” people rises any further.