• Thursday, Feb 27, 2020
  • Last Update : 01:07 pm

Vintage attack

  • Published at 04:15 pm February 6th, 2020

Fashion that followed through love for everything that’s vintage

Dhaka Vintage comes from the story of two sisters who have always worn clothes from the streets of Dhaka, and upcycled clothes all their lives. Both of the sisters always curated vintage, rusting and undervalued jewellery and saris from shops, or their aunties’ wardrobes for themselves. Fathia Tamanna Hoque and Farhia Tamanna Hoque stepped into the fashion industry with the passion and love for vintage style. 

Fathia says that they have often been asked by people about how or where they get their clothes, even from people who shop from the street themselves. This showed them that there was a demand for vintage fashion and eventually led them to use this opportunity for the artful curation of the vast Dhaka street market scene. Thus, Dhaka Vintage was born.

“Dhaka Vintage is a concept store where we curate old clothes, and upcycle, recycle, and repurpose materials to make garments, jewellery, accessories and furniture. We essentially sell our style and art that has developed over the ages,” said Farhia, one of the owners of Dhaka Vintage.

Farhia and Fathia both lived in different countries all their lives; this multicultural exposure to so many tastes, colours, smells, and music has impacted them profoundly. They believe when any expression is unapologetic and pure, beautiful things can be created. Most of their inspiration is rooted in old family photos and watching Bengali aunties while growing up, and vivid memories of Dhaka in the 1990’s. The familiarity and nostalgia that the photos evoke, allow them to channel those feelings through their fashion and creative direction. Both the sisters have very different styles, and because of that, they have attracted a wide spectrum of people. They don’t follow any particular era or a trend. All their pieces are timeless.

Dhaka Vintage never aimed for their brand to grow fast, nor do they just sell anything and everything they find on the streets. Fathia said: “The Dhaka Vintage tribe is very important to us and we want them to value our products as much as we do -- as we are selling our taste more than the clothes themselves.” Their philosophy has been successful and they have attracted like-minded people and repeat customers. The Dhaka Vintage tribe is growing steadily.

A lot of the items they put up were initially bought for themselves, so, for them, most of the pieces are priceless. But also, they had to think of monetary value so that they can sell off the items. And that is why they carefully price things based on attachment to the pieces and try to add the cost of the effort they put in searching through thousands of pieces of clothing in the Dhaka heat and the countless wardrobes of Dhaka aunties. As the saying goes, one man’s trash is another man’s treasure.

“Dhaka Vintage is not a brand just for my sister and I -- it’s a brand for everyone. We would like to set a culture of reselling in Bangladesh so that unwanted clothes can find new homes, where they are wanted and appreciated,” Fathia admitted while describing her dream project.

They want people to sell items that are hard to part with, to people who would love, respect, and pay for it. It’s really about the tribe. Even though it's still pretty early on in their journey, Dhaka Vintage has been able to manifest everything positive and the great feedback has encouraged them to take this to the next level. They will soon be opening a website and bring to life some exciting campaigns. Also, they have recently launched their new line, and there are lots of surprises in store for their lovely customers this year .

The team of Dhaka Vintage is truly grateful to all their tasteful supporters and hope that they will continue supporting them and their love for fashion.