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Review: Asha and the Magic Moshari

  • Published at 06:05 pm April 6th, 2017
  • Last updated at 05:10 pm April 23rd, 2017
Review: Asha and the Magic Moshari
A wise man once said that a simple gesture can have a big impact. The book, Asha and the Magic Moshari, is so beautiful and magical! It talks about one thing: It is useless to be afraid of the unknown. That’s deep, I know, but I heard my inner voice recite this line over and over again as soon as I finished the story.
I love it here, now. Everything, ranging from the urchins on the streets to the unnerving seasonal diversity – this place is perfect. Yes, I say Bangladesh is perfect
The main character, Asha, is very intimidated by the new noises, sights and sounds she receives from a new place. She even feels disgusted by the food her dadu (grandfather) offers her for dinner. To be honest, I could relate to her situation. I used to live in Melbourne, and when I came to Bangladesh once and for all, it hit me like a rock. I didn’t like dal (pulses), and I was NOT fascinated by the combination of a cycle and a carriage with weird drawings on the back of it. I felt particularly scared of the roads in Dhaka and the merciless bus drivers who do not even miss a chance to dangerously overtake another vehicle. I felt strangely connected to this girl, and thus to the story itself. Towards the end of the story, Asha finds out something wonderful and experiences something so surreal, so mysterious that she wakes up next day with a smile, and she looks ready for the day. I love it here, now. Everything, ranging from the urchins on the streets to the unnerving seasonal diversity – this place is perfect. Yes, I say Bangladesh is perfect. I did not expect the story to make me think like this. I know a story means different things to different individuals. To me, it meant all this. Before I finish writing, I want to say this story is a very beautiful and special story and I thank the writer, Pushpita Alam, for writing it.