Tuesday, May 21, 2024

Section

বাংলা
Dhaka Tribune

How a single black and white television united a village

When we heard the Azan on TV, we knew we still needed to wait over five more minutes due to geographical location. We thought how lucky Dhaka residents were as they could break the fast earlier than us. Nothing surprising, that’s just how children’s mind works

Update : 16 Apr 2024, 09:54 PM

In the late 90s, my parents returned from Dhaka to North Bengal after my birth. During that period, most rural areas didn’t see electricity, and we were the only family that owned a television in the village.

Growing up, I had always seen that antique piece at our home. My brothers used to joke that the 17” black and white television is my sibling as my parents bought it for our home after my birth.

Before the late 90s, Bangladesh Television (BTV) was the sole television broadcaster in Bangladesh as the private channels were not available in rural areas then, so our Eid was very BTV-centric.

“When we moved to your Dadu bari, there used to be a huge crowd in our front yard on Friday afternoons. We set up the television in the yard and connected it to a battery as people from nearby villages came here to watch TV programs.

BTV used to broadcast some TV series, Natok of Humayun Ahmed. In the evenings, we used to watch Aaj Robibar. Titli, Kanka, and Boro Chacha were a huge part of our entertainment.”

Anis’ dialogue delivery from the series evoked laughter among the villagers. They were so into watching Natoks that TV commercials did not even bother them. They loved 90s artistic ads too.

We laughed when the characters of the Natoks laughed. We cried when they cried.

The crowd increased on the occasion of Eid. People kept an eye on the upcoming Eid Natok’s trailers. They were eagerly waiting for the popular television program Ityadi. They kept asking when it would be aired as this program runs special segments on Eid. People used to laugh when some foreigners attempted to speak Bangla, and Nana Nati made funny appearances in the show,” my mother was sharing stories from my childhood.

After spending a few years there, my parents moved to a nearby town. So when we were growing up, I did not see the crowd that came to watch television at our home anymore. But the 17” black and white television was still a member of our family.

When Ramadan started, BTV offered some religious programs. When some scholars started answering some queries from the audience and kept telling the benefits of fasting and fazilat of Ramadan and asked to seek forgiveness for sins from the Almighty, I knew it was time to start making Sharbat. When they started playing ghazals, we understood there was not much time left for iftar.

When we heard the Azan on TV, we knew we still needed to wait over five more minutes due to geographical location. We thought how lucky Dhaka residents were as they could break the fast earlier than us. Nothing surprising, that’s just how children’s minds work.

The special cooking shows for Eid and iftar were my favourite. After seeing some fancy dishes on TV, we insisted our mother cook some for us too.

We learned updated fashion trends from televisions and then went for Eid shopping, hunting for the desired dresses.

As we grew up, our old black-and-white television was replaced by new coloured television, and over 60 local and foreign channels made their way into our home as the dish line reached the northernmost district of Bangladesh.

Despite drowning with plenty of options to watch TV programs, my family members were still glued in front of the television if they heard that Ityadi was broadcasting.

When my mother came to visit me recently, we were both watching Nokkhotrer Raat on my laptop as we don’t own a television at my Dhaka home yet. My family members love the 90s vibes and love to walk back to memory lane to the BTV era.

Top Brokers

About

Popular Links

x