• Saturday, Nov 17, 2018
  • Last Update : 02:05 am

Ramadan ruminations

  • Published at 05:33 pm May 24th, 2018
wt-may24-18-pg17-1-1527161544962.jpg
Picture: Bigstock

What do we look forward to the most during Ramadan?

Millions of Muslims in Bangladesh observe fasting, and steadfastness in being better versions of themselves throughout the month. Then there’s the keen anticipation of Eid, shopping, having iftar with one’s nearest and dearest.

To know what people look forward to before and during the holy month, we asked the question to a number of people from different backgrounds.

- I look forward to the opportunity to purify myself. I try to prohibit myself from daily bad habits like smoking. Also, I give priority to the inner calm instead of my usual anger when it comes to reactions. I look forward to the togetherness in having iftar with friends and family. I also try to adhere to my religious duties, which otherwise is often missed because of the so-called important things in life. I look forward to finding inner peace, and give more attention to my spiritual self.

(Robin, Marketing Professional)

- Ramadan is and has always been the month of holiness for me. As a kid, this month used to excite me the most thinking about buying new clothes for Eid. As I have grown older, Ramadan has made me focus more on what I can achieve in this month - concentrating more on my Ibadah and repenting for what I shouldn’t have done. It is also the month when I look forward to spend quality time with my friends and family, shopping, and having meals together. I look forward to sharing my earnings and bonuses with my family, and feeling pleased after seeing the young ones being happy and excited receiving gifts from me.

(Tausif, Restauranteur)

- Every Ramadan, I select a bad habit that I want to quit and a good habit I want to pick up. It is hard to acquire a good habit and even harder to quit a bad habit. I always write down the habit I want to quit and the one I want to acquire during Ramadan, and I stick to it afterwards so that it becomes a part of my life. I believe this is how we can purify ourselves.

(Sabah, Cadet Pilot)

- During this holy month, I look forward to the anticipation of people during the time nearing sunset. Everyone seems out of sorts, dragging themselves back from their work, studies, and duties which they are responsible for. The day-long fast seems to take effect. The time in the afternoon right before sunset is the best time for a walk on the streets of my busy Dhaka, which is otherwise cramped with traffic. I observe the calmness coming from somewhere within ourselves. With the sound of Azan, it’s completely silent. Everyone is having iftar together with joy.

(Zahedi, Marketing Professional)

- Iftar, because iftar is more like a get-together for families, friends, relatives, and loved ones. On this exact time, you find all your family members gathered at the table. Even breaking your fast with friends feels really special. The strangers on the street are also looking to share their food with you during that hour. I remember traveling from Banani to Bashundhara by bus a few years back. It was iftar time and I just had a bottle of water with me and I broke my fast with that. The guy beside me was so generous that he offered me an All Time bread and a banana. That was a heart-touching gesture from my perspective.

(Jaydad, Marketing Professional)

- The best thing about Ramadan for me is the variety of food! Apart from that, I like the positivity in people. Everyone is in a somewhat ‘divine’ mood for helping others, and is encouraging each other to do good. I also look forward to being patient to people of other religions as well. Shutting down restaurants and closure of shops during Ramadan is not the way of Islam as far as I know. One must abstain from over-consumption while considering the need for the less privileged.

(Shibly, Student)