• Wednesday, Dec 11, 2019
  • Last Update : 05:18 am

Sehri Tales

  • Published at 04:39 pm May 12th, 2019
sehri tale

The Sehri Tales Challenge is a writing challenge devised by Sabrina Fatma Ahmad in 2016. The goal is to compose a fresh piece of prose, poetry or nonfiction upon waking up for the pre-dawn meal during Ramadan, and complete it before Fazr.

This year, Litmosphere, one of the largest online book clubs in the country are participating in the challenge. Here are three of the top entries for this week.

Balance

by Boney Eyamin Plabon‎

SSC: Golden A+

HSC: Golden A+

University CGPA: 2.77

Perfectly balanced, as all things should be.

Contrast

by Mosharat Tahia

Having milk with bhaat has always been in my family. I've seen my late-grandma, with the remaining pieces of her teeth, chewing that milk-banana-rice mix as if it was elixir. I'd always look at her plate to check out the colors she made on it. Some days a variety of yellow clouds would float on her milky white sky. Some days if my father forgot to bring bananas while coming home, her milky white sky would have nothing to worry about. There's always 'Gur' to the rescue. She made art on her plates, I swear. Summer never went by without her milky white sky having an orange hue. Nights never went by without her asking me to pass the salt. It was as if I was the artist's assistant, handing her the right amount of color, water, paint, brush, whatever needed for the right contrast.

I had milk with bhaat today for sehri and watched as the remaining oil of the curry floated on top of my milky white sky. And remembered how the artist always asked for her canvas to be perfectly clean. Wherever the artist is, I hope she gets an assistant to pass her the salt.

Flavour

by Rima Sarmin Radcliffe‎

"Hey it's 1am. Why is she crying like that?"

"She wants chocolate, Abba. At this hour! What else was I suppose to do?"

"So you hit my grandchild because she asked for chocolate? You dared to that to her! I'll break your hand if you ever hurt her!"

That shuts up his daughter. He snatches away his granddaughter from his daughter's arms and walks out of the room. His daughter doesn't say another word after that. She knew if she protests, her father will kick her out of the house. Because he loves his granddaughter more than anything else in the world.

With the toddler in his arms, he walks all around the area until he finally finds an open shop.

"Give her whatever she wants", he tells the half sleepy shopkeeper.

While returning home with handful chocolates he kisses his granddaughter on the cheek and says, "Whatever you need, you just tell me. Nana will buy you the world."

Next month it's going to be 20 years since I lost the best Nana that the world can't buy for me. But every time I buy a favourite chocolate or eat anything with chocolate flavour, I smile thinking of him.