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5 reasons you need a time out

  • Published at 09:36 pm June 28th, 2017
  • Last updated at 09:38 pm June 28th, 2017
5 reasons you need a time out
Do you feel like you need a holiday from your Eid holidays? Is the thought of one more dawat making you feel ill? You may just be suffering from social burnout. Nothing a little solo downtime can’t fix. Here are five reasons why some me-time this weekend is just the thing you need. cassidy-kelley-140782 Recharge away Whether or not you were fasting this Ramadan, Eid comes in every year after a month of sleep deprivation, iftar and sehri invitations, shopping, and deadlines, all of which demand a certain amount of energy. After all that, and the marathon socialising during the festival itself, a little alone time can help one recharge and recoup. The amount of time one needs to recharge may vary, but do consider taking a weekend’s timeout from socialising IRL or online to detox. Boost your intuition No, we’re not saying that me-time will turn you into some kind of psychic. But taking a little time to turn down the volume on the thoughts, advice and opinions of other people can help you get in touch with your own inner thoughts and emotions, and help you focus on how you feel about things, apart from outside influences. This goes a long way to helping you build those independent decision-making abilities. Bump up the productivity It’s a little scary at first, going cold turkey for a few hours. But if you can switch off for a day, avoid social media and people in general, you can actually get more done. That paper you’ve been meaning to finish forever? Done. Those chores you’ve been putting off? Completed. When there are fewer distractions, and you’re desperate to fill the time, you will be able to do the needful much more efficiently. sabri-tuzcu-213760 De-stress When you’re not surrounded by people, you don’t have to absorb their problems to add to your own. Taking that timeout once in a while helps you shed that negative energy. It’s not always selfish to do so, either. Occasionally putting some distance between yourself and the needs of others can help you stave off “compassion fatigue”, which is a normal phenomenon experienced by long-time caregivers. Do “you” Being around other people means constant negotiations and compromise. Your partner doesn’t share your taste in music/movies? You’re the only one in the family who thinks dipping fries into milkshake is delicious and not disgusting? Your best friend gives you the side-eye for wearing those shoes with that shirt? No problem. Take a me-day to do what makes you happy. You’ll find yourself resenting others a lot less when you get to scratch that itch.