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Nasa: Chittagong will be under water in 100 years

  • Published at 03:02 pm November 21st, 2017
Nasa: Chittagong will be under water in 100 years
Low-lying Bangladesh will be one of the worst sufferers of climate change and global warming. Some of the country’s coastal areas and cities are at the risk of being swallowed by the sea. Bangladesh’s biggest port city Chittagong, in particular, lies in one of the most vulnerable spots. It is among the 293 major port cities that face the risk of being inundated in the next 100 years, according to a Nasa study. Over the next century, melting glaciers could push the sea level up by 14.01cm in Chittagong. Millions of people will lose their homes and livelihood. A forecast tool, developed by Nasa scientists at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, revealed the devastating result melting ice sheets will have on coastal cities. It shows how melting glaciers can push up sea levels for the port cities. The tool predicts how sea water will be “redistributed” globally by looking at the Earth's spin and gravitational effects. The findings have been published in the journal Science Advances. Surendra Adhikari, a co-author of the study, told the BBC that the tool would help people see the impact on their own cities. Bangladesh’s port city Chittagong will be submerged in the next 100 years along with 292 other cities, Anandabazar Patrika quoted him as saying. He said it would not be possible to save Chittagong given the current rate of sea level rise. Tokyo tops the list of the vulnerable port cities. Mumbai, New York City, London, Shanghai and Hong Kong, among others, are also in the list. Brac, in its Annual Report 2016, said around 27 million people were “predicted to be at risk” of sea level rise in Bangladesh by 2050. Senior scientist Dr Erik Ivins told the BBC that the vulnerable countries have to make plans for the next 100 years to mitigate flooding and "they want to assess risk in the same way that insurance companies do." Bangladesh, one of the most climate vulnerable nations in the world, spends almost $1 billion annually on adapting to climate change, according to 2014 UNEP estimate. The government established a $400 million ‘Climate Change Trust Fund’ in 2009 from its own resources.