Flower prices skyrocket due to low cultivation

Florists consider February as the peak month for flower sales but businesses incurred huge losses for the last two years as there were no programs held due to Covid-19

Every year the demand for flowers increases in the month of February on the account of Valentine’s Day, Pahela Falgun celebrations and International Mother Language Day on February 21, but this year, florists expect lower sales as schools and colleges are closed due to the pandemic.

According to market insiders, they sell flowers worth Tk20-25 crore on February 21, the last of the three big events in February.

The industry insiders said that the number of customers increased on the eve of Pahela Falgun and Valentine’s Day, but sales have not been as expected due to the higher prices.

Moreover, they faced further losses as the first day of Falgun and Valentine’s Day were on the same day. 

Florists consider February as the peak month for flower sales but businesses incurred huge losses for the last two years as there were no programs held due to Covid-19. 

However, the traders from the wholesale market of Jessore, also known as the capital of flowers, hope to make up for the losses they have suffered in the last two years by jacking up their sales this year.

According to the sources from Jessore, the prices of all types of flowers have doubled - roses are being sold at Tk15 to Tk20 based on varieties, which was only Tk2 to Tk5 a month ago. 

Gerberas are being sold at Tk8 to Tk12 per variety and marigolds are being sold for up to Tk500 to Tk700 per thousand, which was Tk200 to Tk300 earlier.

The same flowers are being sold at a price of four to five times more in the capital. 

Ordinary local roses are being sold for Tk40 to Tk50 per piece, while the price of Chinese roses has gone up from Tk80 to Tk100.

Moreover, the price of flower crowns has increased by Tk200 to Tk300 in the Shahbagh and Agargaon flower markets.

Apart from roses, the prices of gladiolus, nightshade, gipsy, rod stick, calendula and Lilium flowers have also gone up.

Islam Hossain, the owner of Mahmud Pushpalay, told Bangla Tribune that the price of flowers have never increased so much in the last 30 years as it has this year. 

“I used to sell flowers for Tk25 but now I am selling them for Tk50. We also hesitate to ask for such high prices from the customers but there is no other way for us,” he added. 

He also said that farmers have suffered a lot in the last two years which caused many to reduce cultivation this year. 

Moreover, winter and unusual rain also affected production, he added.

Abdur Rahim, president of the Bangladesh Flowers Society, a central organization of flower traders of the country, told Bangla Tribune that the price of flowers usually goes up at this time of the year. 

“This year, the price is a little higher than in past years. The main reason for this is the reduced cultivation of flowers to half compared to previous years,” he added.

Moreover, the seeds of gladiolus flowers have been damaged due to the lack of preservation so the farmers could not produce as expected, he added.

“However, the farmers are benefiting from the price hike and it is a good sign, but the retailers are incurring losses,” he added.


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