• Tuesday, Jul 23, 2019
  • Last Update : 01:30 am

Rohingya crisis likely to dominate OIC summit

  • Published at 09:40 pm May 30th, 2019
Rohingya refugees arrive in Bangladesh, September 2017Syed Zakir Hossain
File photo: More than 700,000 Rohingyas fled to Bangladesh from Myanmar’s Rakhine State since late August of 2017 after the security forces launched a brutal crackdown on the ethnic minority Syed Zakir Hossain/Dhaka Tribune

Bangladesh is now hosting over 1.2 million Rohingyas in Cox’s Bazar district

Atrocities, gross human rights violations, crimes against humanity, and staggering brutality of the Myanmar security forces against ethnic Rohingya Muslims is likely to get prominence at the 14th Islamic Summit conference of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) to be held in Makkah on Friday.

Foreign Minister Dr AK Abdul Momen said problems faced by Muslims minorities in non-Muslim countries and the overall Rohingya situation will get special importance at the conference under the theme "Hand in Hand toward the Future”.

Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina, who is now on a tri-nation tour, will lead Bangladesh delegation at the conference to be attended by delegations representing 148 countries, including observer countries, OIC bodies, and heads of various international organizations, reports UNB.

Bangladesh is now hosting over 1.2 million Rohingyas in Cox’s Bazar district. Most of the Rohingyas entered Bangladesh since August 25, 2017 amid military crackdown against them in Rakhine State.

Meanwhile, Amnesty International has gathered new evidence that the Myanmar military is committing war crimes and gross human rights violations in Rakhine State.

The military operation is ongoing, raising the prospect of additional crimes being committed, it said following a recent investigation in Myanmar’s Rakhine State.

In the absence of any due process and government accountability, Amnesty International (AI) called on the UN Security Council to urgently refer the situation in Myanmar to the International Criminal Court (ICC) and impose a comprehensive arms embargo.

Myanmar’s international partners must also rethink about their relations with the Myanmar military leadership and implement targeted sanctions against senior officials through multilateral bodies like the European Union and the Association of South East Asian Nations, it said.

“With Myanmar’s military committing atrocities as brazenly as ever, it’s clear international pressure needs to intensify,” said Nicholas Bequelin, Amnesty International's Regional Director for East and Southeast Asia on Wednesday.

He also stressed, “Again and again, the international community has failed to stop the Myanmar security forces' brutality and protect the civilian population. The Security Council was established to respond exactly to these kinds of situations,  and it is time it take its responsibility seriously.”

The new report, “No one can protect us”: War crimes and abuses in Myanmar’s Rakhine State, details how the Myanmar military, also known as the Tatmadaw, have killed and injured civilians in indiscriminate attacks since January, 2019.

Two meetings as preparation to the 14th Islamic Summit Conference were held in Jeddah.

The OIC Senior Officials held their meeting, in preparation for the Summit, on May 27, in the presence of Member States’ delegations and representatives to the Islamic forum.

The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia’s Foreign Ministry’s Undersecretary for International and Multilateral Affairs Abdulrahman Al-Rassi presided over the meeting that discussed the summit’s draft final communiqué.