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Commuters in Madaripur Sadar struggle with potholed road

  • Published at 06:39 pm November 12th, 2019
Madaripur-Road-Pic-1-
Khagdi-Sreenodi-Tekerhat road in shabby state at Charmugriya Bazar area of Madaripur sadar upazila Dhaka Tribune

Four kilometre stretch of it is in the worst condition

A stretch of 17 kilometres on the Khagdi-Sreenodi-Tekerhat road in Sadar upazila of Madaripur is causing much suffering to commuters.

Sources said a four kilometre stretch of it, from Charmugriya Bazar to Housedi Bazar is in the worst shape of all and has been posing immense risks to passengers on light vehicles for the past two years.

The road is a good shortcut for commuters in Rajoir and Shibchar upazila and can be used to go through these upazilas to Dhaka as well. 

Mohiuddin, a resident of Peyarpur, said buses used to ply on the road when it was in good condition, but due to the bad shape of the road it's not possible anymore. "We are struggling with the poor condition of the road when we have to use it three to four times daily," he added.

According to sources in the district unit of the Local Government Engineering Department (LGED) office in Madaripur, the last maintenance work of the road cost Tk2 crore and 70 lakh in 2014. However, as the road got back to its former poor condition after the last maintenance work, the journey on the road is a daily hassle for around two thousand commuters.

Madaripur LGED Executive Engineer Babul Akter said: "Khagdi-Sreenodi-Tekerhat road will be repaired soon. A new project for the development of the road has already been undertaken. 

"We will begin the work soon and the road will also be broadened. For the time being the potholes are being temporarily filled with sand and brick chips."

On a visit to the critically damaged four kilometre stretch of the road, this correspondent found hundreds of potholes have developed on the road. A little rain is enough to make the situation worse for commuters.

Two essential government institutions, Technical Training Center (TTC) and Ship Personnel Training Institute, fall on the damaged road, causing hardship for trainees who have to attend these institutions on a regular basis.

Ilias Bepari, a TTC trainee, said: "The road is in such an awful state that when I come on an Easy-bike (battery run three-wheeler) to my destination, I feel it will turn over at any moment." 

A three-wheeler driver Mojibor Rahman said: "A little speed is enough to turn my vehicle over. I have seen people stumbling and falling on the road because of the potholes. The bumpy ride hurts my back and have to drive carefully when I have elderly passengers."