• Monday, Aug 26, 2019
  • Last Update : 01:01 am

What the hijacker’s Facebook profile tells us

  • Published at 11:48 pm February 25th, 2019
Web_Mahabi-Palash-Ahmed-Facebook
Screenshot of Palash Ahmed's Facebook profile

A 2016 post revealed that he was tagged as Palash Ahmed, indicating that he did use his real name before, but had changed to Mahibi afterward

After looking at his Facebook profile, psychologists and other mental health specialists have said that Palash Ahmed, who hijacked the BG-147 flight from Dhaka to Dubai via Chittagong, was possibly “socially disenfranchised, vengeful, and suffered from mania.” 

According to Palash’s father, he introduced himself to people as Mahadi, but his Facebook profile shows him as Mahibi Jahan. His Facebook account, opened in June 2010, is barren of any public photos with his family or friends.

A 2016 post revealed that he was tagged as Palash Ahmed, indicating that he did use his real name before, but had changed to Mahibi afterwards.

Prof Tazul Islam with the Mental Health Institute, said: “Mahadi seemed to reject his family identity. His photos overseas and with his wife Simla, and claiming that he worked at British Airways and lived in Scotland, indicate that he was keen to show off. People with these conditions tend to suffer from mania.

“His behavior, however, is not consistent with hijackers in general. People with mania think themselves to be powerful and refuse to cower before anyone. They are capable of performing tremendous feats just to have their way with things. It could also be that he developed a problem in his mind that he could not solve.”

Palash’s last Facebook status at 1:03pm Sunday said: “Wrath and hatred in every breath.”

Prof Tazul said the sentiments mentioned in the status are possibly tied to someone in his personal life, whose actions made Palash feel betrayed and deprived, which could have led to an act of vengeance.

Dr Mahmudur Rahman with the Department of Clinical Psychology at Dhaka University said Palash could have been alienated from reality by crafting a different world on Facebook where he could use photos with his wife to make himself look good. 

He also said the strong, negative emotions in his status are a reminder that society needs to work intimately with children and adolescents to take preventive measures.

Both psychologists agree that it would be wrong to arrive at a conclusion from a Facebook profile, and that accounts from his friends and family should be used to prepare the case.