• Wednesday, Oct 17, 2018
  • Last Update : 05:05 pm

Rohingya relocation to Bhashan Char to begin from October

  • Published at 04:42 pm September 18th, 2018
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File photo of construction work to build houses for 100,000 Rohingya refugees at Bhashan Char, in the Bay of Bengal Dhaka Tribune

The navy has fast-tracked construction of shelters and evacuation centres for 100,000 refugees and nearly three-quarters of the project is complete

Bangladesh will next month start moving 100,000 Rohingya refugees to a remote island, disaster management officials said on Tuesday.

Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina is scheduled on October 3 to officially open newly-constructed shelters for the refugees on Bhashan Char, a muddy islet that emerged from the Bay of Bengal in 2006.

The plan is already behind schedule. Officials previously said they wanted to start moving refugees from overcrowded camps near the border with Myanmar to the island in June, before the monsoon began.

The navy has fast-tracked construction of shelters and evacuation centres for 100,000 refugees and nearly three-quarters of the project is complete, a senior disaster management official said.

Bhashan Char is located 21 nautical miles from Noakhali, 11 nautical miles from Jahajir Char, 4.2 nautical miles from Sandwip, 28 nautical miles from Patenga, and 13.2 nautical miles from Hatiya | Reuters 

"Initially, 50 to 60 Rohingya families will be relocated in the first phase beginning next month," said the official, Habibul Kabir Chowdhury.

Bangladesh, a low-lying riverine country vulnerable to rising sea levels, is prone to tropical cyclones, especially in the Bay of Bengal between April and November. The island is one hour by boat from the nearest land but violent storms make the journey by sea dangerous or sometimes impossible.

The plan to relocate refugees there was revived after 700,000 Rohingya Muslims, fleeing a violent crackdown in Myanmar in August last year, poured into southeast Bangladesh and overwhelmed existing refugee camps.

Rights groups have warned the silty strip is uninhabitable and prone to flooding and other natural disasters, and urged Bangladesh to drop the idea.

But the government pumped $280 million last November into transforming it into a habitable site. 

A navy official said a three-metre-high embankment had been erected around the entire island to make it flood-resistant.

"We're ready to receive refugees," he said, asking for anonymity as he was not authorized to speak to the press.

Secretary of the Ministry of Disaster Management and Relief, Shah Kamal, said the refugees would be able to access humanitarian relief on the island and receive training in skills such as fishing.

Officials say refugees will not be forced to leave existing camps in Cox's Bazar, among the most crowded places on earth and prone to landslides, disease and other dangers.

"If we can ensure full humanitarian assistance to them, I don't see any reason why they won't come to the island. We'll convince them," said Habibul Kabir, the disaster official.