• Wednesday, Nov 14, 2018
  • Last Update : 02:22 am

Super blood blue moon eclipse after 152 years

  • Published at 08:23 pm January 31st, 2018
  • Last updated at 03:19 am February 1st, 2018
Super blood blue moon eclipse after 152 years
The rare trifecta of lunar events that has not been seen since 1866 happened over the skies of Bangladesh and the rest of the world Wednesday evening. The blue moon-blood moon-lunar eclipse occurred around 6pm. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) says the event is unique for three reasons.
1. It is the third in a series of “supermoons,” which is when the Moon is closer to Earth in its orbit-- known as perigee and about 14% brighter than usual; 2. It is also the second full moon of the month, commonly known as a “blue moon.” 3. The super blue moon will pass through Earth’s shadow to give viewers in the right location a total lunar eclipse. While the Moon is in the Earth’s shadow it will take on a reddish tint, known as a “blood moon."

First, it is the third in a series of “supermoons,” which is when the Moon is closer to Earth in its orbit and is about 14% brighter than usual. Second, it is also the second full moon of the month, commonly known as a “blue moon.” The super blue moon passed through Earth’s shadow to give viewers in the right location a total lunar eclipse. While the Moon is in Earth’s shadow, it will take on a reddish tint, known as a “blood moon.”

The Meteorological Department of Bangladesh reported that the phenomenon was visible in Dhaka, Chittagong, Sylhet, Rajshahi, Rangpur, Barisal, Khulna and Mymensingh.

Not just in Bangladesh, the rare lunar event was visible from almost all around the world. Africa and Europe, however, missed this event. The next time this will happen is in 2037. “The supermoon is wonderful because you get to see this slightly larger, brighter moon in the night sky, but it’s really the eclipse that’s going to obscure the supermoon… the brightness will change to that beautiful rusty red colour that people are accustomed to seeing during lunar eclipse,” said NASA Moon Scientist Noah Petro to the Space.com.