• Monday, Sep 24, 2018
  • Last Update : 07:42 pm

Heatwave continues to take its toll

Heatwave continues to take its toll
With a heatwave continuing across the country, the masses, particularly lower income people, have been suffering sweltering temperatures that are likely to persist for the next few days. So dire is the situation that people are not leaving their homes unless there is an emergency. Since Wednesday, those in Jessore have faced some of the harshest conditions, with the district recording the highest temperature across the country on at least three occasions. The highest temperature in Jessore was 37.8°C on Tuesday, while the figure stood at 38°C on Monday. Physicians are recommending that all, especially the elderly and children, stay in cool places until the heatwave passes. [caption id="attachment_64980" align="aligncenter" width="800"]Mujib Sarak, normally the busiest area in Jessore, is practically empty due to the heatwave on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 Touhid Zaman/Dhaka Tribune Mujib Sarak, normally the busiest area in Jessore, is practically empty due to the heatwave on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 Touhid Zaman/Dhaka Tribune[/caption] Abdul Maleq, 55, of Jessore, said that he was forced to pull his rickshaw to make a living for his family. “But my daily income has reduced as there are fewer passengers,” he said. Shahjahan, another rickshaw-puller from the district, seconded Maleq's statement as he said that the scorching heat was not only affecting them physically, but also financially. Shaoli Sultana, an NGO worker also from Jessore, said they were struggling to perform their regular duties as attendance at their programmes had decreased. “If the situation continues for a few more days, we will have to postpone our upcoming programmes,” she added. According to Dr Kallol Kumar Saha of Jessore General Hospital, children and the elderly are at a high risk of heatstroke, dehydration and jaundice while the weather persists. [caption id="attachment_64985" align="aligncenter" width="800"]Physicians say that children and the elderly face particularly high risks of dehydration, jaundice and heatstroke during the heatwave Touhid Zaman/Dhaka Tribune Physicians say that children and the elderly face particularly high risks of dehydration, jaundice and heatstroke during the heatwave Touhid Zaman/Dhaka Tribune[/caption] Our correspondent from Khulna reported that water-borne diseases were on the rise after the heatwave began, with an increasing number of patients admitted to various public and private hospitals in the district. “Temperatures in Khulna soared by 3°C last week, with the district's highest temperature of 38°C recorded on May 21,” Meteorologist Md Parvej Ahmed said. Even education was being hampered, with the number of classes at many schools having been reduced out of consideration for the suffering of students. Furthermore, Power outages in parts of the country were adding to the woes of the general public. In Faridpur, it was reported that electricity is supplied for up to seven hours every day only. Sarwar Hossain, a resident of Bhanga upazila, said: “We do not get electricity for more than 30 minutes at a time.” The same scenario is also prevailing in Bogra. The supply of electricity in the district barely matches up to half of what is in demand, with only a maximum of 95MW available out of a required 150MW.