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EU grant improving health services for vulnerable people in Cox’s Bazar

  • Published at 01:46 am September 26th, 2018
One year of Rohingya crisis: $634 million still needed
Feeding over one million refugees each day costs around $800,000, according to the World Food Programme Syed Zakir Hossain/Dhaka Tribune

'The money is improving life-saving primary healthcare services and helping build capacity to minimize the spread of disease and the magnitude of its effects in the event of an outbreak'

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), a €1 million grant from the European Union (EU) to the organization has been helping improve health services for the roughly one million vulnerable Rohingyas and their host communities in Cox’s Bazar.

Dr Bardan Jung Rana, WHO’s representative to Bangladesh, said: “The money is improving life-saving primary healthcare services and helping build capacity to minimize the spread of disease and the magnitude of its effects in the event of an outbreak.”

Dr Rana also said WHO is currently coordinating the activities of over 100 local and foreign health partners in the Rohingya camps and their adjoining areas, in order to address the sizeable health needs of the vulnerable population alongside the Bangladesh government, reports UNB.

According to a WHO press release, the organization has also distributed nearly 200 metric tons of medicine, supplies, and equipment to health facilities and their partners.

WHO Incident Manager Dr Khalid El Tahir said: “The grant will help WHO to sustain and build on essential services, as well as strengthening disease surveillance to reinforce our coordination capacity to take action during disease outbreaks.”

“WHO is very appreciative of the support from the EU, which comes at a time when the health risks of this vulnerable population is growing and the underfunded health sector of the country is facing a steep climb in sustaining essential services,” added Dr Tahir, who is also heading emergency operations for WHO in Cox's Bazar.

The EU, with its member states, is one of the top global donors of humanitarian aid. It also assists over 120 million victims of war and disasters annually through the European Commission's Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid department (ECHO).

Headquartered in Brussels with a global network of field offices, ECHO provides assistance to vulnerable people purely on the basis of humanitarian needs.