DhakaTribune
Thursday October 19, 2017 04:11 PM

Climate Tracker taking it to climate change

Climate Tracker taking it to climate change
Photo:Courtesy

This year Climate Tracker continues to connect with young people around the world through seven different regional hubs, acting as training grounds for young Climate Trackers around the world

Since 2009, Climate Tracker has brought incredibly talented teams of young reporters to the UN climate negotiations, where they have infamously become known as Negotiator Trackers.

Their combination of passion, insight and drive made us realize how powerful young citizen journalists can become.

Over the years, this organisation slowly expanded its programmes until 2014, refining the understanding of the global media landscape. Then in 2015, it offered one-on-one trainings, skill development courses and mentorships that helped hundreds of young journalists shape the national climate change debate. It created 58 webinars and training videos and published over 2000 articles around the world.

Climate Tracker has engaged thousands of young people across dozens of languages. It has published articles in over 107 different countries and continues to believe that any young person with the right support and persistence can shape their national media landscape.

This year Climate Tracker continues to connect with young people around the world through seven different regional hubs, acting as training grounds for young Climate Trackers around the world.

Climate Tracker South Asia Hub organised a three-day-long workshop on climate journalism on September 21-23 at the British Council in Dhaka, Bangladesh in partnership with International Centre for Climate Change and Development (ICCCAD), Beatnik, PROKAS (Promoting Knowledge for Accountable Systems), British Council and UKAID.

The workshop was inaugurated by Dr Saleemul Huq, director of International Centre for Climate Change and Development (ICCCAD), Catherine Cecil, team leader of Promoting Knowledge for Accountable Systems (PROKAS) and Aoife Garrigan, assistant director of programmes, British Council Bangladesh.

In his opening speech, Dr Saleemul Huq welcomed all the workshop participants, presenters, national and international experts and the organisers. He clearly expressed the special interest of ICCCAD in this workshop.

He then went on to talk about the current calamities Bangladesh is facing. He shared his insight saying: “You must learn about climate change to do something about it…join a movement and be one of the champions to tackle climate change.”

He also mentioned that the first way of defense is diplomacy; there needs to be focus on diplomatic languages in conventions and negotiations.

Catherine Cecil then talked about the activities of PROKAS in Bangladesh. Following her, Aoife Garrigan ended the opening ceremony.

Climate Tracker South Asia Workshop ended with the distribution of the certificates. The facilitators put in a lot of effort to make the workshop a pleasant experience which made it enjoyable for the participators who attended.

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