• Saturday, Sep 21, 2019
  • Last Update : 11:35 pm

Man breeds insects for animal feed in Sylhet

  • Published at 12:12 am September 10th, 2019
Insect farm of Khalilur Rahman in Bishwanath in Sylhet DHAKA TRIBUNE
Insect farm of Khalilur Rahman in Bishwanath in Sylhet Dhaka Tribune

Khalilur Rahman, a resident of London for 17 years, returned to Bangladesh with 150 Black Soldier Fly insects and set up "Haji Biocycle Company", with the ultimate goal of establishing a quail and layer chicken farm

An aspiring investor is breeding Black Soldier Fly (BSF) insects next to his house at Bishwanath in Sylhet in an effort to transform them into potential animal and poultry feed.

Khalilur Rahman, a resident of London for 17 years, returned to Bangladesh with 150 Black Soldier Fly insects and set up "Haji Biocycle Company", with the ultimate goal of establishing a quail and layer chicken farm.

"Initially, I only had the quail and chicken farm in mind. However, after learning how expensive animal feed was, I figured it would be best to search for alternative feed, or Black Soldier Fly in this case, which would reduce my feed price significantly," he told Dhaka Tribune.

From June 26 of this year, he began breeding BSF larvae, which feeds on composting organic waste, such as abandoned vegetable skins, rotten fruits and fish scales.

"These insects contain 40% protein and 20% fat, while a female insect can lay 500-600 eggs in its lifetime," Khalilur said, "The eggs mature in 21 days, after which it becomes ready for consumption as animal and poultry feed."

He observed a kilogram of BSF larvae can be sold for Tk12,000, while BSF's feed form can be sold at Tk35,000-40,000 per kilogram.

The Bishwanath native said he currently has 35,000-40,000 insects at his breeding farm, which he plans to expand. This will enable him to set up his long-desired quail and layer chicken farm by January, he surmised.

Abul Kashem, deputy director at Sylhet Department of Livestock, said his office does not know the details about Khalilur's initiative, but will look into the matter and see if they can provide him with any logistical support.

"BSF will enable farmers to have access to high quality feed at a much lower cost. Larvae castings can also be used as quality organic fertilisers, reducing their reliance on commercial fertilisers," Khalilur hoped.