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‘Engage creatively with China, India and Japan to resolve Rohingya crisis’

  • Published at 11:03 pm August 27th, 2019
‘Engage creatively with China, India and Japan to resolve Rohingya crisis’
Guests pose with the book ‘The Rohingya Crisis: Towards Sustainable Solutions’ during its launching event at Brac centre in Dhaka on Tuesday, August 27, 2019 Mahmud Hossain Opu/ Dhaka Tribune

'Myanmar is not serious, they are playing ‘Tamasha’ [drama] because they have some of the important neighborhood countries in their pocket, at least three countries [China, India and Japan]'

As Myanmar has China, India, and Japan in its pocket, Bangladesh ought to engage with them more creatively for a sustainable solution over the Rohingya issue, said an international affairs expert.

“Myanmar is not serious, they are playing ‘Tamasha’ [drama] because they have some of the important neighborhood countries in their pocket, at least three countries [China, India and Japan],” said international relations Prof Imtiaz Ahmed of Dhaka University during a book launching event held at Brac Centre in Dhaka’s Mohakhali on Tuesday.

“Since they [Myanmar] have them [the three countries] in their pocket they think Bangladesh can do nothing. I think it is important to look into these countries and engage with them more creatively,” he added.

Dr Imtiaz, also the director of centre for genocide studies, urged Myanmar to amend its existing laws and make safe zone in Rakhine by deploying armies from China, Japan, and India who could stay there with Myanmar security forces, so that Rohingyas show interest in going back home.

The book “The Rohingya Crisis: Towards Sustainable Solutions” is edited by Prof Imtiaz Ahmed and published by Brac University, centre for genocide studies, and ActionAid.

Urging Dhaka to pressurize Myanmar, he furthered: “The military officers and the soldiers who had committed atrocities including [sic with] genocidal intent, we need to identify them and crack [down on] them globally.”

Mentioning that some companies, industries, and investors are making lucrative deals with Myanmar, he said: “They ought to be identified and flagged globally. And if possible charges ought to be brought against them as well.”

Poets, singers, writers, journalists and other civil society members of Myanmar ought to be identified and enlisted so that they collectively write against oppressors, Imtiaz said.

He advised national and international media to make content in Rohingya and Burmese language so that their citizens know what is being discussed in Bangladesh.

UN Resident Coordinator in Bangladesh Mia Seppo said: “It’s a complicated crisis and its resolutions are interconnected. Bangladesh deserve praise, not hate speech. Along with resolving the Rohingya crisis we should also ensure so that Bangladesh does not face any hate speech.”

Farah Kabir, Country Director of ActionAid Bangladesh said: “We should think how logical repatriation is without legal right and life security. We should ensure voluntary repatriation, otherwise there will be risk of redundancy of such atrocity.”

KM Abdussalam, director general of NGO Affairs Bureau said that Bangladesh demands the UN to further engage over the issue.

Canadian High Commissioner to Bangladesh Benoit Préfontaine, Justice Dr Syed Refaat Ahmed, Manzoor Hasan, executive director of centre for peace and justice at Brac University and chair of ActionAid Bangladesh also spoke at the event.