DhakaTribune
Wednesday November 22, 2017 04:46 AM

Army looking to complete registration of Rohingya by November 1

Army looking to complete registration of Rohingya by November 1
Inter-Services Public Relations (ISPR)File Photo

'The Rohingya shall not hide being ill. They should immediately visit medical teams of the army when/if they fall sick'

The registration of Rohingya people, who have taken shelter at refugee camps in Cox’s Bazar after escaping the ongoing campaign of assault on them in Rakhine state of Myanmar, must be completed by November 1.

Armed Forces Division sent a notification to the stakeholders in this connection.

Contacted, Maj Sazeda, acting commander of 40 Field Regiment Artillery, however, refused to confirm this, saying: “There’s no such decision that the registration process will not continue after November 1; rather, from the date onwards we will ask to see registration cards to provide relief goods to the Rohingya.”

Around 550 members of the 10th Infantry Division of Bangladesh Army prepared a code of conduct on September 23, when they started working on relief distribution and rehabilitation of the forcibly displaced Myanmar nationals.

AKM Lutfor Rahman, assistant commissioner and executive magistrate in the district, said: “We have yet to decide on when the registration process will end. But the government has been trying to complete it as early as possible.”

The district administration is, too, working on a code of conduct for the refugees.

In addition to the rules the Rohingya are required to follow if they want to go outside their camps, the code of conduct sets out what they can do and what they cannot as long as they stay in Bangladesh, said the officials concerned.

According to the code of conduct, the Rohingya will stay in Kutupalong Refugee Camp. Armed forces will take actions against those who will go east of the camp.

“The Rohingya shall not hide being ill. They should immediately visit medical teams of the army when/if they fall sick,” it reads.

It also asks them not to seek alms on Kutupalong and Ukhiya roads as there is a risk of falling prey to deception if they go outside the camps.

They have also been urged not to buy anything (such as land and houses) from locals.

For the locals, the code of conduct says they “shall not deceive the Rohingya, rent out property, and sell land to them. Also, local people shall not give them ride in their vehicles.”

Law enforcement agencies will take actions against those who are found breaching the rules, it adds.

In addition to the 400,000 Rohingya who are already living here, over half a million people have fled to Bangladesh from Myanmar since August 24, after ethnic conflicts in Rakhine sparked the most rapid human exodus since the Rwandan genocide in 1994.

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