DhakaTribune
Tuesday January 16, 2018 07:42 PM



  • Colorado floods leave hundreds unaccounted for

    Colorado floods leave hundreds unaccounted for

    Many others are still awaiting rescue
    More than 500 stranded victims of major flooding in Colorado braced for a new round of heavy rain Sunday that is threatening to impede rescue efforts.

    Officials noted that many of those unaccounted for may simply not be able to telephone loved ones because of flood damage to many cell phone towers.

    New flash floods were expected to inundate the area, which thousands were forced to evacuate. A flash flood watch was in effect through the evening for the entire Denver metro area, as well as the northern Front Range Foothills and mountains.

  • Hawaiian woman wins 35-letter name battle

    Hawaiian woman wins 35-letter name battle

    A Hawaiian woman with a 35-letter surname has persuaded the Pacific island US state’s authorities to change their official ID card format, because her king-sized name won’t fit.

    Janice Keihanaikukauakahihuliheekahaunaele, whose traditional Hawaiian name comes from her late husband, said she would never consider using a shortened version, and so used local media to press officials to take action.

  • Florida pastor arrested before he could burn Qur’an

    Florida pastor arrested before he could burn Qur’an

    75 gather In Mulberry for an interfaith prayer service to counter Jones’ actions

    Law enforcement officers arrested a Florida pastor on Wednesday as he drove to a park to light nearly 3,000 Qur’an on fire to protest the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.

  • US spied on Brazil’s Petrobras oil firm: report

    US spied on Brazil’s Petrobras oil firm: report

    NSA intercepted communication from Brazilian and Mexican presidents, Globo reports
    The US government spied on Brazilian state-run oil giant Petrobras, according to intelligence documents released by Globo television.

    Globo said it obtained the information from Glenn Greenwald, a columnist for the Guardian newspaper who obtained secret files from US National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden.

    A week ago, the network reported that the NSA had intercepted communication from the presidents of both Brazil and Mexico, a report also based on information from Greenwald.

  • Google argues for right to continue scanning Gmail

    Class action lawsuit says Google “unlawfully opens up, reads, and acquires the content of people’s private email messages”
    Google’s attorneys say their long-running practice of electronically scanning the contents of people’s Gmail accounts to help sell ads is legal, and are asking a federal judge to dismiss a lawsuit that seeks to stop the practice.

    In court records filed in advance of a federal hearing scheduled for Thursday in San Jose, Google argues that “all users of email must necessarily expect that their emails will be subject to automated processing.”

  • US Senate panel approves use of force against Syria

    US Senate panel approves use of force against Syria

    ‘What we've done today is a step in the right direction’

    President Barack Obama's plan to conduct punishing military strikes on Syria passed its first congressional hurdle on Wednesday, paving the way for a full Senate debate on the use of force, AFP reports.

  • US drug agents using vast AT&T database, New York Times says

    US drug agents using vast AT&T database, New York Times says

    "The government has easy access to decades' worth of information on millions of Americans"

    US law enforcement officials investigating drug crimes have had access, using subpoenas, to a large AT&T Inc database that contains the records of phone calls dating back to 1987, according to a New York Times report.

    The report, published on Sunday, said under the 6-year-old program, the government pays telecommunications giant AT&T to place employees in drug-fighting units around the country. The employees sit with Drug Enforcement Administration agents and local detectives and supply them with the phone data, it said.

  • FBI increases surveillance of Syrians in US

    The FBI has beefed up its surveillance of Syrians living in the United States ahead of a possible US military attack on Syria, The New York Times reported Sunday.

    The domestic intelligence agency and the Department of Homeland Security have also alerted federal agencies and private firms that any US strike could trigger cyberattacks, according to the report.

  • FBI increases surveillance of Syrians in US

    The FBI has beefed up its surveillance of Syrians living in the United States ahead of a possible US military attack on Syria, The New York Times reported Sunday.

    The domestic intelligence agency and the Department of Homeland Security have also alerted federal agencies and private firms that any US strike could trigger cyberattacks, according to the report.

  • Obama seeks congressional approval for Syria strike

    Obama seeks congressional approval for Syria strike

    The military operation could happen tomorrow, next week or in the near future, says Obama

    US President Barack Obama on Saturday said his country should take military action against Syria and he would seek Congressional authorisation for military operations.

    He said the military operation could happen tomorrow, next week or in the near future.

    "We cannot and will not turn a blind eye to what happened in Damascus," Obama said in a statement at the White House Rose Garden.

    As commander-in-chief, Obama has the constitutional authority to order military action without the backing of Congress.

  • US conducted 231 ‘offensive cyberoperations’ in 2011

    The Post also reports, under a $652m project, US specialists hack foreign computer networks to secretly put them under American control
    US spy services conducted 231 “offensive cyberoperations” in 2011, mostly targeting Iran, Russia, China and North Korea, the Washington Post reported Saturday.

    The revelation is based on a classified intelligence budget provided to the paper by fugitive leaker Edward Snowden, as well as on interviews with former US officials.

    The Post also reported that, under a $652m project code-named “GENIE,” US specialists hack foreign computer networks to secretly put them under American control.

  • Fort Hood gunman rests case without making statement

    Fort Hood gunman rests case without making statement

    Standby defence attorneys for Hasan attempted to present so-called mitigating evidence that could be used to argue for a life sentence rather than the death penalty
    US Army Major Nidal Hasan, facing the possibility of a death sentence for the November 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood, Texas, rested his case without making a statement in the sentencing phase of his trial on Tuesday.

    The jury of 13 military officers, who convicted the Army psychiatrist of killing 13 people and wounding 31 others, was instructed to return to court on Wednesday, when it will likely begin deliberating Hasan’s sentence. Most of those killed and wounded were unarmed soldiers.

  • Mexico migrant train derailment kills 6

    The cause of the accident was not yet known

    A cargo train carrying US-bound migrants derailed in a remote and swampy area of southeastern Mexico on Sunday killing at least six people and injuring several more.

    The train known as “The Beast,” which carries Central American migrants who pay smugglers to sit atop freight cars, careened off the track near a river in Tabasco state before dawn, with eight freight cars derailing, officials said.

  • Mexico migrant train derailment kills 6

    The cause of the accident was not yet known

    A cargo train carrying US-bound migrants derailed in a remote and swampy area of southeastern Mexico on Sunday killing at least six people and injuring several more.

    The train known as “The Beast,” which carries Central American migrants who pay smugglers to sit atop freight cars, careened off the track near a river in Tabasco state before dawn, with eight freight cars derailing, officials said.

  • Thousands in Washington mark ‘I Have a Dream’ speech

    Thousands in Washington mark ‘I Have a Dream’ speech

    Foremost on many minds was Trayvon Martin

    Tens of thousands gathered Saturday to mark 50 years since the March on Washington, the civil rights watershed where Martin Luther King Jr famously declared: “I have a dream.”

    Under blue skies, the predominantly – but by no means exclusively – African American crowd swelled around the Reflecting Pool, cheering a procession of speakers who addressed them from the white marble steps of the Lincoln Memorial.

  • NY sues Donald Trump for ‘Trump University’s get-rich’ claims

    NY sues Donald Trump for ‘Trump University’s get-rich’ claims

    'Trump University engaged in deception at every stage… and caused real financial harm'

    New York’s attorney general sued Donald Trump for $40m Saturday, saying the real estate mogul helped run a phony “Trump University” that promised to make students rich but instead steered them into expensive and mostly useless seminars, and even failed to deliver promised apprenticeships.

  • As Syria war escalates, Americans against US intervention: Reuters/Ipsos poll

    As Syria war escalates, Americans against US intervention: Reuters/Ipsos poll

    More Americans would back intervention if it is established that chemical weapons have been used, but even that support has dipped in recent days

    Americans strongly oppose US intervention in Syria’s civil war and believe Washington should stay out of the conflict even if reports that Syria’s government used deadly chemicals to attack civilians are confirmed, a Reuters/Ipsos poll says.

    About 60% of Americans surveyed said the United States should not intervene in Syria’s civil war, while just 9% thought President Barack Obama should act.

  • Fast-moving wildfire threatens power in San Francisco

    Fast-moving wildfire threatens power in San Francisco

    The fire has damaged the electrical infrastructure serving the city, and forced the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission to shut down power lines, the governor said in his declaration
    A wildfire raging at the edge of Yosemite National Park is threatening power lines that provide electricity to San Francisco, prompting California Governor Jerry Brown to declare a state of emergency.

    The fire has damaged the electrical infrastructure serving the city, and forced the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission to shut down power lines, the governor said in his declaration.

    There were no reports of blackouts in the city, which is about 320km west of the park.

  • US repositions naval forces, no decision on Syria strike

    US repositions naval forces, no decision on Syria strike

    US Navy would expand its presence in the Mediterranean to four destroyers from three

    The United States on Friday was repositioning naval forces in the Mediterranean to give US President Barack Obama the option for an armed strike on Syria, although officials cautioned that Obama had made no decision on military action.

    A defense official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the US Navy would expand its presence in the Mediterranean to four destroyers from three.

  • Guardian shares Snowden docs with New York Times

    Guardian shares Snowden docs with New York Times

    The Guardian has agreed with the New York Times to give the US newspaper access to some classified documents leaked by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden, both papers said on Friday.

    In a brief story posted on its website, the Guardian said it “struck a partnership” with the Times after the British government threatened the Guardian with legal action unless it either surrendered or destroyed files it received from Snowden about Government Communications Headquarters – Britain’s equivalent of NSA.

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