DhakaTribune
Tuesday January 16, 2018 03:56 PM



  • Time for the youth to take the reins

    Letting it go to pieces is not an option and it's up to this generation to come together and find the solution

    Bangladesh needs you. Yes, I am talking to you – the next generation. When the entire country around us goes down in a tailspin, the onus lies on you and me to pull it back. The older generation has failed to live up to Bangladesh’s founding dreams; you and I need must pull things back together. Such a feat is only possible if we can learn to overcome our differences and work together towards a shared purpose.

  • Who will speak for the dead? Demand an end to violence

    Who will speak for the dead? Demand an end to violence

    We're willing to be up in arms about things that happened 40 years ago but we cannot spare a moment to protest injustices that we see everyday 

    For all our pride and arrogance-filled daily bedroom rants against those who have destroyed our nation, we forget that we are part of the problem.

    Our tacit acceptance of tragic events and our short-term memory is absolutely unforgivable.

    This is a democracy. We are as much to blame for the state of our nation as any other actor in the demise of civility as a whole. We no longer value life or truth in any real sense of the words. Both of which must be held as a sacred standard for any developed society to flourish.

  • Loud and clear: Bangladeshi youth choose their platform

    The next generation has found its voice through the Internet

    I never knew how active Bangladesh, as an entire country, was virtually until the Shahbag story broke out on social media this year. You can have your opinions about the movement, be dismissive or inspired, but one thing few can argue is that online activists played a critical role in using the Internet to organise and spread the story, and got thousands of young Bangladeshis to work together.

  • Loud and clear: Bangladeshi youth choose their platform

    The next generation has found its voice through the Internet
    I never knew how active Bangladesh, as an entire country, was virtually until the Shahbag story broke out on social media this year. You can have your opinions about the movement, be dismissive or inspired, but one thing few can argue is that online activists played a critical role in using the Internet to organise and spread the story, and got thousands of young Bangladeshis to work together.

  • The Hefazat long march signaled a new normal

    The Hefazat long march signaled a new normal

    Redrawn lines pits Islamists against secularists in mutual shows of massive support

    If recent events were billed as a show of strength between Islamist and secular forces in Bangladesh, the showdown fizzled. The Islamist group Hefazat-e-Islam, led by the aging cleric Ahmad Shafi, was able to draw hundreds of thousands of supporters to Motijheel during their long march program, dwarfing the counter-rallies organised on that day by opponents. The general strike and blockade called by the latter failed to stem the flow of white-robed men marching on Motijheel.

  • Blaming the government? Time to put things into context

    Under the circumstances, perhaps the government is doing the best it can

    Those who speak in the public domain tend to blame the government for whatever happens around us. People often contradict themselves when they place blame on the government’s shoulders. For example, many people blamed the government for granting permission to Hefazat-e-Islam to go through with their grand congregation, while others criticised the government for creating impediments in Hefazat’s procession and gathering. While the government does shoulder some blame, we need to account for the pressure they face, and our own points of view.

  • Like? Like hell I will!

    Like? Like hell I will!

    The bane of employers is the stuff of change
    In what is bound to be felt as a slap in the face for human resource managers around the globe, the website glassdoor.com recently named Facebook as the best employer in the world. As an employer, I was offended and frustrated by the award. It was a little upsetting that I wasn’t even considered as a possible recipient, though I suppose the blame for that lies with my colleagues who did not participate in glassdoor’s employee survey.

  • Loud and clear: Bangladeshi youth choose their platform

    The next generation has found its voice through the Internet
    I never knew how active Bangladesh, as an entire country, was virtually until the Shahbag story broke out on social media this year. You can have your opinions about the movement, be dismissive or inspired, but one thing few can argue is that online activists played a critical role in using the Internet to organise and spread the story, and got thousands of young Bangladeshis to work together.

  • Beware the boomerang effect, it’ll get you too

    Those who give free rein to their government cannot complain when things turn sour

    When you ask an already powerful state to expand its powers further, so as to pummel those you oppose, don’t be surprised if the state also decides to use that power against you.

    Don’t be surprised when that state, to whom you gave a “free pass” on anti-people activity of the past few years (because this one time you liked its activity), uses that support of yours to harm both you and your opponent.

  • The age of the citizen: Who really speaks for the people?

    Fictional democracy will no longer be sufficient. Not in New York, not in Cairo, and certainly not in Dhaka.

    The nature of politics has changed throughout the world. In the past, the masses would beg for leaders. Nowadays, however, from the “99%” in downtown New York to Tahrir and Shahbag, the citizen is the leader.

    The issues that these citizens are imposing on the political class may be unrealistic (Occupy Wall Street sought the end of the capitalist system), but it is the voice of the people that has risen to set the agenda. This voice can no longer be ignored.

  • Time for us to define Bangladesh

    We need to do a better job of representing our true face to the outside world

    ‘Amar Shonar Bangladesh” – iconic words from the first days of our independence. Bangabandhu spoke these words from his heart. In those three simple words, I believe, he expressed a vision of what he thought Bangladesh could become: A country that could fulfil its potential through the expression of a historic culture.

  • Come flap your lungis! All garments deserve equality!

    The situation is desperate Something needs to be done I’ve decided not to take it lying down The next time someone insinuates that I live in an Ivory Tower I’ll proudly proclaim I AM A LUNGI ACTIVIST! Ode to a Lungi, Kaiser Haq

    Little did I imagine, when I wrote the poem, that a dramatic opportunity to translate words into action would suddenly present itself, and that too amidst a continuing, nerve-wracking political crisis that has violently split the country into two definitive camps.

  • The Starvation Raj

    Counting the high human cost of Britain's Indian experience  

    Today, 94 years ago, India finally abandoned any hope of living in peace with the British Raj. When British guns blazed frenetically in Punjab shedding blood in the holy city of Amritsar, our awkward, abusive marriage was well and truly over.

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